Can Dogs Eat Strawberry Leaves?

Can Dogs Eat Strawberry Leaves?

Some of you may be surprised to learn that all parts of the strawberry plant, including the leaves, the stems, the flowers, and even the tops (calyx) of the fruits, are edible. Plus, they can be beneficial for our health.

Do you have strawberries in your garden and wonder whether it is safe for your dog to eat their leaves and plants?

Read on for the answer to the question and the possible advantages of adding some strawberry leaves to your pup’s menu.

Can Dogs Eat Strawberry Leaves?

Strawberries are among the healthiest and safest fruits you can add to your dog’s diet.

The good news is that you can also add some strawberry leaves to it or leave the green tops of the fruits before feeding them to your pet.

Strawberry leaves are not toxic for canines. In fact, they are rich in some essential nutrients which can help boost your furbaby’s health and wellbeing.

Both the strawberries and their leaves are loaded with antioxidants. They can help fight off the free radicals and prevent serious illnesses in both humans and dogs.

What Are The Health Benefits For Dogs Eating Strawberry Leaves?

The dark green leaves of the strawberry plant are packed with essential nutrients, including vitamin C, vitamin K, iron, flavonoids, and polyphenols, and also contain astringent tannins, fragarin, and proanthocyanidins. They are not only nutritious and healthy but are known to have medicinal properties, which is why many people use them for making tea and tinctures.

But what are the potential health benefits of giving your dog strawberry leaves? Here are the main ones:

1. They are anti-inflammatory

The leaves of the strawberry plant contain caffeic acid, which has powerful anti-inflammatory properties. It can help alleviate various inflammations in dogs, including arthritis and joint pain.

2. They are rich in vital nutrients

Like the fruits, the strawberry leaves and stems are a natural source of vitamin C and K, iron, calcium, and other essential nutrients.

3. They contain antioxidants

The antioxidants found in strawberry leaves will help destroy the free radicals and thus keep the dog’s cells, organs, and body healthy and well.

Are There Any Risks of Giving Strawberry Leaves To Your Dog?

As with every human or plant-based food which is not part of the natural diet of our carnivorous friends, you should always feed them in moderation and occasionally, rather than use them as the dog’s primary meals.

With strawberry leaves, the risk for canines comes from the high tannin content in them. If a pup consumes too much tannin, this can lead to digestive problems and, in extreme cases, to more serious long-term harm to its organs and health.

Some common symptoms of tannin poisoning include vomiting, diarrhea, a loss of appetite, and lethargy.

For peace of mind, we recommend speaking with your vet before adding new ingredients, such as strawberry leaves to your dog’s diet.

Another important tip is to introduce the leaves in small quantities first and watch your pup for any allergic or other adverse reactions. If everything looks okay, you can gradually increase the amounts over time.

Still, feed the strawberry greens to your dog sparingly and occasionally only.

How To Prepare The Strawberry Leaves For Your Dog?

The simplest way to add some healthy strawberry leaves to your pet’s menu is to chop them up and mix them with its regular dog food.

You can use the strawberry leaves when baking some dog-friendly dog treats too.

Avoid giving it whole leaves directly to prevent digestive upsets or possible choking.

Final Words

Why put all of those beautiful dark green leaves to waste once you have picked the strawberries from your garden?

You can use them as a healthy ingredient for different types of dishes and teas yourself.

Or you can incorporate them into your pup’s food too.

These leaves are packed with healthy nutrients. But make sure to monitor your pup for adverse effects or allergies, and only give it well-chopped small amounts on occasion.

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